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  • BRIEF HISTORY OF BIOCHEMISTRY AS A DISCIPLINE.
    The Department of Medical Biochemistry in the Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences Okuku Campus was established in February 2007, Approval was given by the Nigerian University Commission (NUC) in December 2007, However, academic activities started in January 2009 with the first intake of 45 students with Dr. Elias Ugian as the pioneer Ag Head of Department who served up to August 2011. Dr. Godwin O. Obochi was appointed on the 1st August 2011and replaced by Dr. A.B Utu Baku as the Head of the Department in August 2012.
    The human body was discovered by schleiden and schivannto be composed of various units of living cells each made up of a balanced quantity of three classes of substances: viz water the most important substance of life; organic substances such as carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. These are also referred to as biomolecule in addition to inorganic substances called mineral elements. The study of the physicochemical analysis of these substances is what is called Biochemistry. In other words, biochemistry is the chemistry of life or of the living tissue, through the analysis of living materials. The biochemist studies the substances found in living organisms or the composition of living tissues, the various reactions by which components of life are synthesized and degraded, the regulation and control of these interlocking system of chemical reaction so that there is growth in infancy, maintenance in maturity, and degradation in old age. Thus, biochemistry attempts to correlate biological function with molecular structure.

    Biochemistry is a multidisciplinary applied science which deals with the chemical processes and mechanisms in living organism. The foundation of the science of Biochemistry was laid between 17th and 18th centuries. It all began with progress made in the physical sciences which in turn led to identification of the major atmospheric gases and demonstration of the use of oxygen and production of carbon dioxide by animals and the photosynthetic reversal of this relationship in green plants by Antoine Lavosisier and joseph priestly in the 18th Century. However, before this period, Lavosiser and Laplace in 1785 showed the Law of conservation of energy and matter applicable to the physical world and biological systems, thereafter, discoveries were made and reported, viz, isolation of purified materials from living things that they all contain carbon was recognized, thus giving birth to organic chemistry. Berzelium formulated the general principles of catalysis and biological catalyst such as ptyalin of saliva. Pepsin of gastric juice and amylase of sprouted malt were reported.

    Later, the chemistry of fermentation from the work of Pasteur was appreciated. Meanwhile, as inorganic and physical chemistry flourished, law of thermodynamic were establish. Darwin’s doctrine of evolution gained acceptance, the principle of genetic inheritance were formulated by Gregor Mendel, towards the end of 18th century, Emil Fisher established the structures of many carbohydrates, learned to separated amino acids from hydrolysates, of proteins, initiated the concept of official configuration of carbohydrates and amino acids and demonstrated the specificity of enzyme action.
    In postulating the lock and key of enzymatic action, Fisher began the study of the relationship of the topography of macromolecules to the phenomenon of life. With these studies the realization was that life processes involve a phenomenon explained by physical and chemical laws, particularly the roles of enzymes and proteins as catalysts leading to modern biochemistry. The term BIOCHEMISTRY was then introduced by Carl Neuberg, a German scientist in 1903.

    RELEVANCE OF BIOCHEMISTRY TO MEDICINE
    Biochemistry is the language of Biology. The tools for research in all the branches of medical sciences are mainly biochemical in nature. The study of biochemistry is essential to understand basic functions of the body. This study will give information regarding the functioning of cells at the molecular level. How the food we eat is digested, absorbed, and used to make ingredients of the body? How does the body derive energy for the normal day to day work? How are the various metabolic processes interrelated? What is the function of genes? What is the molecular basis for immunological resistance against invading organism? Answers to such basic questions can only be derived by a systematic study of biochemistry. Modern day medical practices are highly dependent on the laboratory analysis of body fluids, especially the blood. The disease manifestations are reflected in the composition ofblood and other tissues. Hence, the demarcation of abnormal from normal constituents of the body is another aim of the study of biochemistry.

    Biochemistry is perhaps the most rapidly developing subject in medicine, thanks to the advent of DNA-recombinant technology; genes can now be transferred from one person to another, so that many of the genetically determined diseases are now amenable to gene therapy
  • To gain admission into the Faculty a candidate must credit passes in English Language, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, and/or Physics in not more than two sittings from WAEC, NECO and any other recognized Examination bodies by the University, in addition to passing UME and University Post UME Test. Graduates of (HND or B.Sc.) in related disciplines at upper credit level shall be considered.

    PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
    The four year programme has each year divided into two Semesters for student who intends to major in Biochemistry. A core course unit is a course unit designed by the department/faculty as the basic requirement for a particular degree and which must be offered and passes by the student who intends to graduate in the discipline. Students in the Department are also permitted in consultation with an adviser of the student to take elective courses in which he/she may offer on the advice of the Department.

    REGISTRATION
    Registration of new students
    All new students usually undergo preliminary screening before registration for courses. The students are required to present original copies of their credentials for prima-facie screening at the Academic Planning Unit, subject to verification by a certificate Verification Committee. Registration normally lasts for two weeks. Returning/new students must duly register within this period all prescribed courses at the beginning of each semester. Failure to duly register within this period attracts a late registration fee. This concession is for a period of one week.

    Procedure for Registration
    a) Payment of all prescribed fees to the Bursary Department
    b) Collection of appropriate course registration forms from the Registry.
    c) The choice of course, which should be made in consultation with the Faculty or Department or Students’ Adviser.
    i. Lecturer teaching the courses or an appropriate officer designated to sin on behalf of the lecturers signs the forms. The departmental registration officer signs all the departmental courses on behalf of the lecturers taking them.
    ii. The students signs the forms followed by the academic Advisers, heads of Department, Deans and the Registrar.
    iii. Completed forms are submitted to the Department, Faculty, Academic Planning Unit, Academic office and students Affairs unit.
    iv. All students whose registration forms have not been submitted to the HOD’s Office at the end of the late registration period shall be deemed to have failed to registrar for the semester irrespective of whether they have paid their fees or not.
    v. Changes to registered courses after submission of the registration forms could be done on prescribed Add/Delete forms. This allows the student to delete (drop), add or substitute courses already registered for. To become effective, such changes must be approved by the HOD/Dean.
    The electronic procedure for registration requires that students after satisfying (c) above go to the ICT centre to upload such courses on the internet.

    Registration guideline for students with carry over courses/probation
    Students who have carry over courses and those on probation shall be guided by the following during registration:
    a) It should be noted that the maximum number of units to be registered for by a students with carry over courses must first register such courses.
    b) All students with carry over courses. That is, subject to (a) above, priority in course to be registered shall be as follows:
    i. Carry over courses at lower level before higher level.
    ii. Core courses at new (higher) level.
    iii. Unearned lower level(s) units of electives (if any) as stipulated by the department or
    iv. Stipulated units of electives at new (higher) level.
    c) Any stipulated course unit(s) that cannot be accommodated within the maximum 24 units shall be taken during the next (higher) level. This allows students who have outstanding courses at the end of the minimum period to continue for an additional period of four semesters
    d) Students on probation shall register for carry over core courses and unearned stipulated unit of electives before new (higher) level courses. That is, for students on probation, the priority of registration of courses shall be as in (b) above. The student on probation is expected to concentrate on clearing the backlog of carry over courses and electives in order to improve on his/her CGPA. He/she may take higher-level courses subject to (a) above.
    To be accepted as a bonafide student eligible to attend lectures and take examination the student must duly register with the department within the stipulate period for all prescribed courses at the beginning of each semester as specified period, will pay a late registration fee.

    ACADEMIC STANDARD
    The general standard is as contained in the University student’s information Handbook and academic programmes for each Department.

  • STAFF OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL BIOCHEMISTRY
    Head of Department of Medical Biochemistry
    Dr. A. B. Utu-Baku (B.Sc., M.Sc., PhD). Biochemistry

    Departmental Examination Officer
    Mr. Mike O. Odey (B.Sc, M.Sc.)

    LIST OF ACADEMIC STAFF OF THE DEPARTMENT


    Name of staff

    Rank/Designation  Salary scale, date of first appointment

    F/T

    Qualification dates obtained and specialization, membership of professional association and number of publications

    Post qualification Work/Teaching experience and date, post held and the organization

    Other responsibilities/ interest in curricular and extra-curricular activities

    (1)

    (2)

    (3)

    (4)

    (5)

    (8)

    Dr. Utu-Baku A.B

     

     

    Senior Lecturer
    CONUASS 5/5

    Full Time

    B.Sc. 1980, M.Sc. 1997, Ph.D. 2002.
    Member: NSBMB, VSP, NSN, BSN, Publications, 20

    Lecturer II
    Lecturer I
    Senior Lecturer
    CRUTECH

    HOD, member of Senate

    Prof. Ebong P.E

    Professor CONUASS 7/10

    Sabbatical

    Higher Diploma, 1971, M.Sc. 1976, PhD, 1981

    Assistant Lecturer
    Lecturer II
    Lecturer I
    Senior Lecturer
    Professor

    Member of Senate, Member curriculum committee

    Prof. Eteng U. M

    Professor CONUASS 7/10

    Adjunct

    B.Sc, 1988, Ph.D, 2000

    Assistant Lecturer
    Lecturer II
    Lecturer I
    Senior Lecturer
    Professor

    Member of Senate, Member curriculum committee

    Prof. Edeogu C.O

    Professor CONUASS 7/10

    Adjunct

    B.Sc. 1991, M.Sc. 1997, Ph.D, 2007.

    Assistant Lecturer
    Lecturer II
    Lecturer I
    Senior Lecturer
    Professor

    Member of Students’ Advisory committee

    Dr. Asuk, A.A

    Lecturer I
    CONUASS 4/2

    Full Time

    M.Sc. 1996, PhD., 2009
    Member: NSBMB

    Assistant Lecturer
    Lecturer II
    Lecturer I

    Coordinator of some courses, Chairman seminar and Research committee, etc

     

    Name of staff

     

    Rank/Designation  Salary scale, date of first appointment

     

    F/T

     

    Qualification dates obtained and specialization, membership of professional association and number of publications

     

    Post qualification Work/Teaching experience and date, post held and the organization

     

    Other responsibilities/ interest in curricular and extra-curricular activities

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Yakubu, O.E

    Lecturer II
    CONUASS 3/2

    Full Time

    B.Sc. 2006, M.Sc., 2010, Ph.D.(In View )

    Assistant Lecturer
    Lecturer II

     

    Dasofunjo, K

    Assistant Lecturer
    CONUASS 2/2

    Full Time

    B.Sc., 2003, M.Sc., 2008, PGDE, 2010.

    Assistant Lecturer

    Time Table Officer

    Ugwu, M.N

    Assistant Lecturer
    CONUASS 2/2

    Full Time

    B.Sc., 2005, M.Sc., 2011, Ph.D., (In View)

    Assistant Lecturer

    Chief Examination Officer

    Okafor, A.I

    Assistant Lecturer
    CONUASS 2/2

    Full Time

    B.Sc., 2005, M.Sc., 2011
    NSBMB

    Assistant Lecturer

     

    Ujong, U.P

    Assistant Lecturer
    CONUASS 2/2

    Full Time

    B.Sc., 2008, M.Sc., 2011

    Assistant Lecturer

     

    Odey M.O

    Assistant Lecturer
    CONUASS 2/2

    Full Time

    B.Sc., 2007, M.Sc., 2011, Ph.D. (In view)

    Assistant Lecturer

     



    TECHNICAL STAFF MED. BIOCHEMISTRY
    S/N

    NAME

    RANK/DESIGNATION WITH DATE OF FIRST APPOINTMENT

    QUALIFICATIONS WITH DATES ATTAINED

    DUTIES PERFORMED

    1.

    Mr. Otu O. Onem

    Chief Technologist, 30/7/87

    F. N.I.S.T., 1984 C&G(Full Tech),1984 A.N.I.S.T, 1990

    General lab work /Administration

    2.

    Mr. Edward   N.        Osang

    Technologist I  23/2/12

    A ,N.I.S.T., 1990
    PGD 1995

    Laboratory practical/Administration

    3.

    Mr. John Enyam

    Technologist II

    HND,2005 PGD Applied Biochemistry 2010

    Laboratory practicals/Administration

    4.

    Mr. Ezekiel Obogo

    Chief Lab Assistant, 25/9/200

    W.A.S.C., 1989

    ASSIST in lab work/Animal House Administration.


    ADMINISTRATIVE NON-TEACHING STAFF

    S/N

    NAME

    RANK/DESIGNATION

    QUALIFICATION/DUTIES/SALARY

    1.

    Mr. Echa Fidelis Echa

    Higher Executive Officer

     

    2.`

     

     

     

    3.

     

     

     

  • Pattern of Examination
    Each course is examined at the end of the semester it is offered. The examination normally involves a theory paper, which may include a practical paper and/or an oral interview. Final year projects and research papers may be examined at the end of the second semester. The university does not conduct re-sit examination.

    DURATION OF EXAMINATION
    The number of credit units for the particular course shall determine the time allowed for a written examination. One credit unit shall be examined for one hour, two credit units for two hours, and three or four credit units shall be for three hours.

    ELGIBILITY FOR EXAMINATION
    In order to qualify to sit for university examination, candidates must:
    1. Be registered for the approved course
    2. Satisfy the attendance requirement of 75%
    3. Pay all fees prescribed by senate
    4. Comply with any other requirement prescribed by the senate, faculty, or Department, regarding satisfactory attendance of or completion of course-work, assignments, practical, projects etc.

    EXAMINATION RULES
    As contained in the general university students information handbook.

    DURATIONS OF PROGRAMME
    The minimum period allowed for a student to remain on the programme is usually 150% of the minimum period (ie.6 sessions). The minimum and maximum duration of programme is as given in the table below;
    Programme

    Nature of admission

    Minimum period

    Maximum Period

    B.sc

    UTME

    4years

    6year



    Direct entry

    3years

    5years


    EXAMINATION MISCONDUCT
    i. No student shall communicate with any other student or with any other person, except with the invigilator when absolutely necessary. In addition, no student shall make any noise or cause any disturbance during an examination.
    ii. No book, paper, printed or written document or other aid may be taken into an examination room by any student, except as may be stated in the rubric of a question paper. Any candidate found in possession of such prohibited items shall be made to sign an examination irregularity form and a written report made to the chief examination officer. The chief examiner shall in turn investigate and report to the departmental examination board, which shall determine whether or not to accept the student’s script or make any other recommendations to the faculty board of examiners.
    iii. Mobile phones shall not be taken into examination hall.
    iv. No students shall, directly or indirectly, give assistance to other students, or permit other students to copy from or otherwise use their papers. Similarly students shall not directly or indirectly accept assistance from students or other persons.
    v. Except for the printed question paper, a student shall not remove from the examination room or mutilate any paper or other examination materials supplied.
    vi. At the end of the time allotted, the invigilator shall instruct all students to stop writing, and stand up.
    vii.At the discretion of the chief invigilator a candidate may be required to leave the examination is adjudged to be disturbing or likely to disturb the examination. The chief invigilator shall report any action taken to the head of department immediately;

    Senate shall decide the penalties in cases of proven gross mis-conduct.

    EXAMINATION AND GRADING SYSTEM
    Pattern of Examination
    Each course is examined at the end of the semester it is offered. The examination normally involves a theory paper, which may include a practical paper and/or an oral interview. Final year projects and research papers may be examined at the end of the second semester. The university does not conduct re-sit examination.

    Duration of Examination
    The numbers of credit units for the particular course shall determine the time allowed for a written examination. One credit units shall be examined for one hour, two credit units for two hours, and three or four credit units shall be for three hours.

    Eligibility for Examination
    In order to qualify to sit for university examination, candidates must:-
    1) Be registered for the approved course.
    2) Satisfy the attendance requirement of 75%
    3) Pay all fees prescribed by Senate
    4) Comply with any other requirements prescribed by Senate, Faculty, or Department, regarding satisfactory attendance of or completion of course-work, assignments, practical, projects, etc.
    Measurement of performance course shall be measured in terms of:
    a) The scores in the continuous evaluation
    b) The results of the prescribed theory and/or practical examination in the course.
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